The Six-Figure Travel Writer

Daily Free Travel Writing Webinars for April

You can now stream all of our past webinars–one each weekday–for free.

These webinars are only available at the times listed, live, but you can catch the replay in video, audio, and transcript form, along with the webinar slides, at any time in our on-demand webinar library.

Check out the full schedule of April’s webinars and register for your favorites below.

Read More

Join Us for Free Travel Writing Lessons on Putting Together Quest, Diary and As-Told-To Features

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

Read More

How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking for Interviews with a Local

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

WestJet

“Going Local” profiles a local from one of the WestJet destinations. In about 500 words, they give seven recommendations of places they love in their hometown. Recommendations include things like their favorite bar or restaurant, the best music venue, where to get back to nature, or the best places to go for a walk. Most of these are generic but usually one or two are specific to the person. For example, a celiac giving their favorite gluten-free restaurant or a musician their favorite bar for live music. There is a short third-person introduction which describes the person profiled followed by the recommendations which appear as quotes from the person. There is also the “Getting There” sidebar which, in about 20 words, tells readers how they can get to the destination with WestJet. Recent examples include musician Francis Macdonald highlighting his favorite spots in Glasgow, CEO of Collective Arts Brewing Matt Johnston on Hamilton, Ontario, and executive director of the Museum of the African Diaspora Linda Harrison’s recommendations for San Francisco.

Read More

How to Take Ownership of Your Freelance Travel Writing Success

When I was first asked to coach other travel writers on how to meet their business goals and finally get their dreams off the ground, I spent a long time thinking about it, observing writers I knew, and taking stock of the marketplace.

The 18 months of research that led to The Six-Figure Travel Writing Road Map  actually centered very specifically on one question:

What is the difference between the writers who have normal careers as if they were in any other field, earning a great amount of money, buying houses, etc., and those that never seem to be able to crack making this into a viable, stable, long-term career?

Read More

Join Us For Free Travel Writing Lessons on Putting Together Interview, Postcard and Guide Features

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

Read More

How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking for Itinerary Departments and Features

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

Brownbook

“24 Hours” is found within “Cities” and covers a 24-hour trip to a city with a 1,000-word piece. This is usually a destination close to the city the issue is featuring, although occasionally it can be a city which is linked to this in some way. After a short introduction, the article is divided into timeslots, usually from 10am to 6pm, and covers things to do throughout the day. These could include markets, neighborhoods, art galleries, and other cultural attractions. Cities recently covered include Samsun in Turkey for the Ankara issue, Karaj in Iran for the Tehran issue, and Santiago, Chile for the Palestine issue due to it having the largest population of Palestinians outside of the Middle East.

Read More

A Small Moment of Inspiration from One of My Students

I just finished a coaching call that made me so verklempt over and over.

The person I was talking to was a single mom in a very sandwich generation time of her life who was literally in the process of giving up on her writing dream when we started working together.

Read More