The Six-Figure Travel Writer

Join Us This Week for Free Travel Writing Lessons on Working with Travel Companies and Tourism Boards

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

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How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking for City Profiles (Edition VIII)

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

National Geographic Traveler

“Smart Cities” highlights a city undergoing an interesting cultural shift often with a focus on new initiatives to protect the environment. There is a 150-word introduction covering why and how the city is changing. This is followed by the subheadings “Eat,” “Play,” “Stay,” and “Shop.” There are three options highlighted for each covering restaurants, attractions, hotels, and shops respectively with a third-person description. A quote from a local can sometimes be found in the introduction. Cities covered in this section include Aarhus, Denmark; Newcastle, Australia; and Kigalia, Rwanda.

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This Travel Article Pitch Blew Me Away–And the Reason Why Will Surprise You

While reviewing pitches on a coaching call recently, I gushed at length to a writer I’ve been working with for probably about a year now about how commanding her “about me” or P3 of her pitch was.

She was pretty tickled about this, because she insisted she really hadn’t done anything different in it than the last few pitches she sent me.

I tried to hone in one what it was in the language that made confidence simply waft from the screen and realized that I didn’t even recognize a number of the places she had listed as her publication credits. That wasn’t “it”—there was still something buried in the language and syntax—but I exclaimed during my search that I didn’t even know she had placed stories in some of these outlets.

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“What questions should I ask when I’m on the phone with a potential travel content marketing client?”

We’ve got a new book out, 101 Things You Need to Know to Make it as a Travel Writer, that answers 101 questions that we hear from travel writers all the time that are holding them back from achieving their Dream of Travel Writing. To celebrate the new book, we’ll be tackling a new sticky travel-writing situation each Monday here on The Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

“What questions should I ask when I’m on the phone with a potential client?”

Here are seven questions that you can use as a checklist the next time you’re on a call with a potential travel content marketing client. Each of these questions is really important in helping you put together your proposal.

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Join Us This Week for Free Travel Writing Lessons on How to Set Your Travel Writing Goals and Make Them a Reality

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

Read More

Want to Hit the Ground Running with Travel Content Marketing? Check Out Our New Series on Perfecting Your Cold Pitches

Sales. Ugh, right?

I know. I know. Everyone hates it.

Especially writers.

The problem though with that situation though, is that sales, according to the Oxford Dictionary, means:

the exchange of a commodity for money; the action of selling something.

So, if we want to have a writing business, or any kind of freelance business (the practice of making one’s living by engaging in commerce–again via Oxford), we’ve got to exchange some things for money.

For most writers, the question then becomes:

How can I get money without having to do the icky sales exchange bit?!

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How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking For Celebrity Interviews (Edition IV)

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

Condé Nast Traveler

“The Globetrotter” is a celebrity profile written in a Q&A style. The piece runs from 750 to 1,000 words and focuses on the celebrity’s travels. There are about 15 questions which change with each issue but some are frequently seen including: “where you have just come back from?” “where in the world have you felt happiest?” and “name a place that lived up to the hype.” Actresses Chloë Sevigny and Rosamund Pike were recently profiled for this section.

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Are Travel Writers Really Magicians?

As I’ve been designing our new Travel Writers Detox + Reset retreat, I’ve been thinking about the topic of burnout.

The other side of this Janus coin is often thought to be balance, and I’ve seen a number of newsletters from freelancers and other online business owners recently concerning their struggles with this topic. Maybe it’s September sneaking up on us and reminding us that we’re now one an accelerating train headed for the holidays.

I’ve often seen, whether in my own life, something I’ve read, or conversations with others, that the opposite of burnout is something more akin to revitalization–rekindling your love for either what you’re already doing or something else entirely that is what really lights you up.

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“What is story selling and how can I use it to pitch clients?”

We’ve got a new book out, 101 Things You Need to Know to Make it as a Travel Writer, that answers 101 questions that we hear from travel writers all the time that are holding them back from achieving their Dream of Travel Writing. To celebrate the new book, we’ll be tackling a new sticky travel-writing situation each Monday here on The Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

“What is story selling and how can I use it to pitch clients?”

Story selling is this really neat thing where you use some very age-old techniques of how to create a beginning, middle and end of a story around the issue that you see that an organization is facing but you paint yourself as an integral part of that story. With story selling, you show the prospect that the golden land on the other side isn’t possible without your help.

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Join Us This Week For Free Travel Writing Lessons on Building Relationships with Editors and Charting a Course for Success

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

Read More