The Six-Figure Travel Writer

“How do I write a pitch for a travel magazine article?”

We’ve got a new book out, 101 Things You Need to Know to Make it as a Travel Writer, that answers 101 questions that we hear from travel writers all the time that are holding them back from achieving their Dream of Travel Writing. To celebrate the new book, we’ll be tackling a new sticky travel-writing situation each Monday here on The Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

“How do I write a pitch for a travel magazine article?”

All pitches should have three key sections, typically in the same order, to be successful:

  • the lead/lede or intro grabbing the editor’s attention and showing why your topic is interesting
  • the outline on how you’ll write the piece that fleshes out what it will be about and shows where it fits in the editor’s magazine or website and when
  • the “I’m so great” (ISG) paragraph or why you should be the one to write the article

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Join Us for Free Travel Writing Webinars on Breaking Into Guidebook Writing and Taking Photos Editors Want

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

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How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking for Mini Essays

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

Wingspan

“Double Take” is a 400-to-500-word article that explores bicultural life in Japan. It’s written in first person, usually by an expatriate living in Japan, and frequently centers around one specific encounter that showcases the intersection of two cultures. For example, one recent article discussed what it was like to receive the kairan — or “neighborhood circular” — as a foreigner. In this story, the writer described feeling pressure to circulate the kairan around her neighborhood, despite lacking Japanese fluency. Like many “Double Take” articles, the writer incorporated scenes, dialogue, personal narration, and frequent Japanese terminology throughout the piece. Other past articles discussed a Japanese-American couple that disagreed on the importance of sugar, a mother who helped her son use Japanese ferments for a science experiment, and an expat family who chose to raise their kids in Japan. Text is accompanied by original artwork. There are no images or sidebars.

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Words of Wisdom from the Book Passage Travel Writers and Photographers Conference 2019

While this isn’t a complete compilation of all of my favorite moments–even I can’t take notes all the time!–I wanted to share with you some words of wisdom from this year’s Book Passage Travel Writers and Photographers conference that particularly spoke to me.

I’ve collected insights I hope will resonate with all writers, no matter where you’re at in your career.

But some are aimed at overturning assumptions I know many harbor about how the industry works, whether from the perspective of getting the writing done or how to work with editors. Read More

Win a Ticket to the Tribe Writers Conference! Let Us Know What Job Listings You’d Like to See in Our Newsletter to Enter

Each week, in our newsletter, we round up all the travel jobs we can track down on all corners of the internet for you.

You can see examples of what we’ve turned up in the past here, here, and here.

Our team spends a significant amount of time each week scouring the web to pull these together for everyone, and we want to make sure that we’re picking out the right jobs for you!

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“I’ve sent three pitches to a magazine and keep getting the response that their content calendar is full. Should I keep following up or give it a rest for a while?”

We’ve got a new book out, 101 Things You Need to Know to Make it as a Travel Writer, that answers 101 questions that we hear from travel writers all the time that are holding them back from achieving their Dream of Travel Writing. To celebrate the new book, we’ll be tackling a new sticky travel-writing situation each Monday here on The Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

“I’ve sent three pitches to a magazine and keep getting the response that their content calendar is full. Should I keep following up or give it a rest for a while?”

This question refers to a followup formula we recommend writers follow two weeks after they send a pitch to an editor.

Read More

Join Us For Free Travel Writing Lessons on Crafting Magazine Pitches and Letters of Introduction

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

Read More

How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking for Itinerary Departments & Features (Edition II)

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

Whisky Advocate

“48 Hours” is a two-day itinerary to a different city, usually on in the U.S. These articles run from 1,000 to 2,000 words long and, after a short introduction, are divided into “Day 1” and “Day 2.” Recommendations are found within the second-person article and often include distilleries, breweries, bars, restaurants and the occasional café, museum or attraction. There’s a sidebar at the end of the piece which rounds up places mentioned in the piece giving the name and website for each. A few more recommendations may be included here such as a shop, tour, hotel, or further bar or restaurant. Destinations recently covered include Kansas City, Missouri; Nashville, Tennessee; and Tucson, Arizona.

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My Short Formula for Writing Productivity Magic

It really all started, for me, with one travel writer.

You know the story. Writer has blog. Writer has blogged for some number of years. Writer makes cards boldly and proudly proclaiming the job title “travel writer and photographer.” Writer lands one or two gigs writing for other websites.

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“I really enjoyed your Idea-to-Pitch series, how can I adapt that for a magazine-first approach?”

We’ve got a new book out, 101 Things You Need to Know to Make it as a Travel Writer, that answers 101 questions that we hear from travel writers all the time that are holding them back from achieving their Dream of Travel Writing. To celebrate the new book, we’ll be tackling a new sticky travel-writing situation each Monday here on The Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

I really enjoyed your Idea-to-Pitch series, how can I adapt that for a magazine-first approach?

I often talk about idea-first versus magazine-first pitching. Idea-first pitching is when you start from the subject matter rather than starting from the market. The idea can be for a trip or something you’ve seen around that you think would make a good magazine article. Sometimes it can be a trip that you have coming up that you haven’t gone on yet.

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