The Six-Figure Travel Writer

Join Us for Free Travel Writing Lessons on Generating Article Ideas and Pitching Magazine Sections

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

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How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking for Business Profiles (Edition II)

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

Australian Traveller

“Rewind” covers the history of an Australian company in about 500 words. In third person, the article goes into detail about the company’s past covering how it started, evolved and changed over time. These can be companies that have since gone out of business or ones still operating today, but usually they have had large significance to Australians at some point. Quotes from owners can sometimes be found, especially if the business is still operating. There is sometimes a news peg, such as an anniversary, and often important or memorable events in the company’s story are outlined. Further details are sometimes included at the end of the article such as the website and any event information if the company is still around. Recent examples include “Sun Never Sets,” which details the history of Sun Pictures, an open-air movie theater in Broome for its 100-year anniversary, “Cobb & Co: The History of Coach Class,” covering the transport service Cobb & Co who began transporting Australians via horse and cart in 1853, and “Ice Cream Evolution: Streets’ Summertime Legacy,” covering the ice cream company Streets, who also launched Australia’s first individual frozen treat, the Paddle Pop.

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Where Will This Summer Take You? (And Your Travel Writing Career Goals?)

Something I love about the summer travel season is the uncontrollable and unavoidable return to essential enjoyments:

  • The feeling of the sun on your skin on a beautiful dry day.
  • The cooling barrage of a steady breeze during a beautiful hike on a humid day.
  • Finding berries and eating them fresh off the bush.
  • A juicy peach or plum that reminds you what fruit is meant to taste like.
  • Sitting on the grass, or the beach, or any other place outside where there is no plastic or concrete between you and the world.
  • Sitting with friends or family late into a fresh evening enjoying a moment in which nothing else matters and it seems the morning will never come.
  • The view of the ocean and artistry of the clouds from an airplane window reminding you how big the world really is.

Whether it’s the weather, kids off from school, or simply the many holidays that encourage us to take vacation, summer has a way of forcing us to remember what really makes us happy and the outsized value of small pleasures.

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Does Your Travel Magazine Article Pitch Need Help?

In our webinars, retreats, and online pitching programs, I frequently talk about putting my “editor hat” on.

I don’t usually mean these literally–as in “it’s time to edit your work!” I actually mean that it’s time for some very tough love that you rarely get to hear: exactly what an editor would think if your pitch rolled into their inbox without warning.

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Want to Give the Back Half of 2019 a Serious Energy Boost with Us?

I just want to take a quick second to acknowledge that this post is definitely not for everyone on who follows us.

We have people coming to us in many, many different stages of their freelance travel writing careers, from the very early pre-planning/looking for options point to people have been been in the game for dozens of years and regularly publish with top outlets or other places they have long-standing relationships with.

What I am writing to you about today is for people at the latter end of that spectrum, folks who are full-time freelance, even if all of their writing income doesn’t come from travel-related writing.

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Calling All Digital Nomads (or Future Digital Nomads): What Is Missing From Your Best Writing Life? Let Us Know and Win a Very Productive Prize!

Lifestyle design, as it was frequently referred to back in the day (this was popularized by Tim Ferriss’s The 4-Hour Workweek, but pre-dated him to my knowledge) before internet anywhere in the world was just a matter of switching your cellphone plan, focuses on your lifestyle.

In theory, at least.

You know, that whole be-in-control-of-your-schedule-and-live-wherever-you-want-doing-tons-of-travel-to-interesting-places-while-earning-a-full-time-living-and-only-working-part-time dream.

I’ve noticed, however, that when embarking down that very idyllic-sounding path, people are often stuck choosing between the lifestyle part and the work/supporting themselves part.

(Want to jump to this week’s survey? Head here.)

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“How do I know which editor to pitch at a travel magazine?”

We’ve got a new book out, 101 Things You Need to Know to Make it as a Travel Writer, that answers 101 questions that we hear from travel writers all the time that are holding them back from achieving their Dream of Travel Writing. To celebrate the new book, we’ll be tackling a new sticky travel-writing situation each Monday here on The Six-Figure Travel Writer blog.

“How do I know which editor to pitch at a travel magazine?”

There’s no hard and fast rule of who is the right editor to pitch at different travel magazines.

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Join Us for Free Travel Writing Lessons on Using AP Style and Writing Magazine-Style Essays

In the two years since we began running regular one-hour travel writing classes, we’ve covered more than 80 topics, including:

  • how to land free trips
  • how to get paid really, really well for your writing
  • how to get on magazine editors’ good sides
  • how to navigate every step of the process to land travel content marketing work, including phone calls and proposals
  • how to keep your hourly rate down so your bank account goes up
  • how to get work done on the road
  • how to write, step-by-step, 15 different types of travel articles
  • how to land guidebook and other traditional publishing deals

You can grab access to all of our past webinars (and a ton of other resources you can’t find anywhere else) with a subscription to our Dream Buffet or grab them one-by-one when you need them in our On-Demand Webinar Library for a set with the video, audio, transcript, and slides.

But we also air a free replay of one of our travel writing classes each and every weekday.

Read More

How to Pitch Five Magazines Looking for First-Person Feature Sections

Welcome to the Friday Freebie Five, a new weekly feature on Dream of Travel Writing’s Six Figure Travel Writer blog.

Each week, we comb our Travel Magazine Database to bring you five magazine sections open to freelancers around a theme–front-of-book trend pieces, long-form first-person features, short narrative postcards–to inspire your pitches.

United Rhapsody

Feature article “First Person, Far Flung” is written in the first person and recounts a writer’s journey through an exotic place, such as the Swedish Arctic or Jamaica. It looks at places from a different perspective; whether a well-known person, the history or culture. The writer’s talk about their first-hand experience and meet local people along the way. The feature is a multi-page spread and can be up to 2,000 words with images interspersed throughout.

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Daily Free Travel Writing Webinars for August

You can now stream all of our past webinars–one each weekday–for free.

These webinars are only available at the times listed, live, but you can catch the replay in video, audio, and transcript form, along with the webinar slides, at any time in our on-demand webinar library.

Check out the full schedule of August’s webinars and register for your favorites below.

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